James Bretherton (circa 1730-1806): Concerto Spirituale / The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1917.
Wed 09.06.2021 6.00 pm Berghyddan, Helsinki
Music at the Manors
Thu 10.06.2021 4.00 pm The German Church, Helsinki
The Summer Concert Series of the German Church

The master and the student

Works by Beethoven and Czerny

Beethoven–Czerny

FiBO Players:
  Tommi Hyytinen, natural horn
  Asko Heiskanen, clarinet
  Jussi Seppänen, cello
  Jerry Jantunen, fortepiano

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ATTENTION! The concert in the German Church begins at 4 pm.

Ludwig van Beethoven composed his sonata for french horn, op. 17, for Giovanni Punto and together they concerted at the Burgtheater in Vienna on the 18th of April, 1800. Beethoven postponed his composing to the very last minute and wrote the music for the french horn just one day before the concert. The piano part Beethoven improvised during the concert. Later on, Beethoven finalized the sonata and wrote a version for cello as the solo instrument as well. The sonata for french horn, as well as op.11, the trio for clarinet, cello and piano, were both pioneers for this style. The trio Beethoven composed for the clarinetist Joseph Bähr, who also suggested the trio from the opera L’amor marinara by Joseph Weigl as the theme of the final. The composition by Weigl was a hit at that time (Gassenhauer), and the Beethoven trio got its nickname from that. 

Out of Beethoven’s students, the biggest mark in music history was made by Carl Czerny. Czerny’s production consists of 861 opus pieces and even more non-opus pieces. Those he composed while practicing playing the piano, which he did 12 hours a day. Czerny became one of our history’s most markable piano teachers, and his students were Franz Liszt and Sigismond Thalberg, to name a few. Also Antonie Oster belonged to Czerny's most talented piano students, but her career came to an end when she died at the age of only sixteen. But at the age of fourteen, together with three famous orchestral musicians, Oster premiered with Czerny’s piece Grande Sérénade concertante op. 126. Grande Sérénade belongs to Czerny’s most brilliant compositions which begins in adagio and finishes with an eventful final. 

More information about the instruments:
Natural horn: A copy of Antoine Courtois’ interment from approx. 1813–1838, made by Daniel Kunst
Clarinet: A copy of August Grenser’s instrument from 1790, by Peter van der Poel in 2001
Cello: anonymous, from the 18th century
Fortepiano: A copy of Conrad Graf’s instrument from the 1820s, by R.J. Regier

The concert is organized in collaboration with the piano music department of the Sibelius Academy. 

Duration: 1 h (no intermission)

The ticket sale will begin on 1st of June in FiBO's web shop. There will be only 10 tickets available. The ticket for these concerts of very limited audience in June costs 35 €.

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